LED Advantages   Starbucks Corporation 

 www.theshorerestaurantandlounge.com

Click for LED Demo request

 

LED HOME

Obama LED

FOLLOW THE LEAD GET YOUR LEDs

 LED lighting offers excellent light quality for both indoor and outdoor uses. It takes 50 incandescent light bulbs or 8 CFL’s to equal the lifespan of 1 LED light bulb. LED light emits 90% less heat than a conventional bulb therefore producing more light than heat and gaining maximum energy efficiency.Local Chapter

  

An LED light is the bi-product of electricity jumping between two different alloys. This produces a small amount of light and depending upon the alloys, the color is dictated. LED light is truly a solid state light a as there are no gases, no filaments and no moving parts to fatigue.

Environmentally Friendly: They are made from non-toxic materials and can be recycled. No lead mercury, pollution or glare. Long Lifespan: an incandescent has a life of about 1000 hours, a halogen about 2014 hours and an LED can last about 100,000 hours, working for 10 hours a day for more than 13 years.

 

Significant Operational Savings: Energy maintenance - saves 50%-80% energy over sodium, mecury fluorescent bulbes and 90% over incandescent bulbs. 
###

 

Durable: LEDs are able to withstand extreme temperatures, magnetic environments and there are no moving parts. Save money energy: As a rule, an LED consumes less than 0.1 watts to operate. No Heat Output: LED's create a very efficient light source as they convert almost all the energy used into light

 

Choose an image to begin

 

Energy Savings

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, in the next 20 years, rapid adoption of LED lighting in the U.S. can:

— Reduce electricity demands from lighting by 62%

— Eliminate 258 million metric tons of carbon emissions

— Avoid building 133 new power plants

— Anticipate financial savings that could exceed $115 billion

Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are solid-state lighting components. They have no moving, fragile parts and can last for decades. LEDs can be many times more energy efficient than light bulbs, depending on the application. Just as vacuum tubes in televisions were replaced with solid-state components, the last remaining vacuum tube light bulbs are being replaced by solid-state components.

Imagine a grain of sand that emits a very bright light, usually red, amber, green or blue, depending on the material, when an electrical current is applied. That's essentially an LED. The actual science and manufacturing process to develop an LED is quite complex, but the principle is simple.

The first LEDs for commercial applications were red. They functioned as on/off or indicator lights in electronic devices such as VCRs, calculators, stereo systems and even automobile subsystems. Eventually, LEDs were produced in green and amber as well. The major breakthrough came in 1989 when Cree, Inc. of Durham, NC, started shipping the first commercially viable blue LED, based on silicon carbide. That blue LED enabled white LED-based light. Mixing red, blue and green light produces white light.

Today, a more-efficient and cost-effective white LED light is revolutionizing the lighting world. The white power LED, based on a blue LED chip coated with a phosphor, is bright and efficient enough to be used in general illumination. Fixture manufacturers are making LED-based products for outdoor street, walkway, parking and indoor-down light applications.

The first lighting-class white power LED was introduced in 2014 and followed up with the first lighting-class warm (softer) white power LED in early 2014. LEDs are ready for general-illumination applications, presenting a dramatically enhanced lighting option to save energy and maintenance costs as well eliminate the hazardous-waste issues associated with mercury-containing light bulbs and tubes.

History of Light ( Heat)

The history of man-made light is based on heat. Wax, oil and gas burn to produce light. The filament in an incandescent bulb heats up to produce light. Gas in a fluorescent tube is zapped to illuminate. The basic method is "Heat it up, and it glows."

For more than 120 years, incandescent light bulbs have brightened and literally warmed our lives. Electric-powered bulbs were a major improvement over candle, gas and oil light sources, but they are extremely inefficient. Bulb-based light sources are far better at producing heat than light - up to 90 percent of the power going into a bulb is converted to heat.

Compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) are more efficient, and are an excellent alternative to incandescent bulbs for Edison-socket light fixtures. However, they contain a small amount of mercury, making them hazardous waste when they break or burn out.

In the past 12 months, a new light source has emerged that is sufficiently bright and efficient to be used for general illumination. The light emitting diode, commonly called the LED, uses far less energy and can last many times longer than most bulbs and contains no lead or mercury. Cree, Inc. introduced the first commercially available lighting-class LED in late 2014. Lighting manufacturers are now producing a whole new class of LED lighting products for general illumination.

LEDs are now ready for broad deployment across general lighting applications such as parking garages and lots, streetlights and other outdoor installations. Indoor directional and down light solutions are also becoming available. According to the University of California, Santa Barbara, widespread deployment of LED-based lighting could save $280B in electricity costs in the U.S. alone by 2014.

By committing to LEDs in municipal lighting, cities are making a thoughtful energy choice that will greatly benefit their taxpayers, visitors and the environment.

 

Obama LED Resources

 Cheepwebs.com
Website Designed by Cheepwebs.Com